Facts About Aortic Stenosis

Filed under Health

Aortic valve stenosis is a kind of heart disease where the aortic valve has become narrowed. The aortic valve is found at the left ventricle of the heart along with the aorta. The aortic valve is known to be the largest artery where the output of blood always takes place.

Fact 1: When aortic valve stenosis is happening in the body of a person, the tendency for the left ventricle is to perform twice its regular movement because of the narrowing of the valve.

Fact 2: Because of the double work of the ventricle, the muscles found in the walls of the ventricles will result in a thicker formation, and because of this, the person will be experiencing chest pains.

Fact 3: Calcific aortic stenosis is more common in older people, and it is happening because of the deposits of calcium in the valve.

Fact 4: Aortic valve stenosis can occur because of two possible reasons. One is that the condition might take place during birth or inborn, and the second reason is that aortic valve stenosis may be acquired.

Fact 5: Men are more prone to having aortic valve stenosis than women, but the disease is not very common in society.

Fact 6: Though aortic valve stenosis can be cured with surgery, there is a risk that the heartbeat would not be the same as it is.

Fact 7: One of the causes of aortic valve stenosis is rheumatic fever. However, rheumatic fever is becoming rare in the United States.

Fact 8: An abnormal sound coming from the heart that can be heard with the use of a stethoscope is an indication that a person is having aortic valve stenosis.

Fact 9: Aortic valve stenosis is common for old people because it may occur during the adulthood of an individual.

Fact 10: Aortic valve stenosis is more frequent to occur in third-world countries than in the industrialized countries.

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References :


[0] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001230/
[1] http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000178.htm