Facts About Owls

Filed under Animals

There are about 205 species of owls. Owls have long been a part of human folklore and legend. The diet of owls include a variety of prey ranging from: mammals, birds, insects, and some reptiles. Some African and Asian species feed on birds.

Fact 1. Owls’ eyes are fixed in their sockets and, due to this, they have to turn their head to see things. They are far-sighted but able to see very well in low light.

Fact 2.   Many species of owls have special flight feathers adapted for silent flight that is useful for quickly catching prey.

Fact 3.    The tufts of feathers atop some owl’s heads, referred to as ‘ear tufts’ are for display only.

Fact 4.   Owls have strong feet like raptors used for catching prey

Fact 5.  Owls do more than just hoot—they create many different vocalizations. Amongst the Great Horned Owls, male and female owls will sing duets during the mating season.

Fact 6. The collective name for a group of owls is a parliament.

Fact 7. Depending on the size of the captured animal, smaller prey is swallowed completely while larger ones are torn into sizable proportions before swallowing.

Fact 8.  Owls are found in all regions of the Earth except Antarctica, most of Greenland, and some remote islands.

Fact 9. The goddess of wisdom in Greek and Roman folklore, Minerva, was symbolized as an owl.

Fact 10.  The owl’s characteristics of being able to see in dark and obscure places have linked it to education and intellect. The insignia of educational institutions of higher learning and libraries normally includes the owl as a symbol of intellectualism.

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References :


[0] http://www.facts-about.org.uk/facts-about-owls.htm
[1] http://www.facts-about.org.uk/facts-about-owls.htm
[2] http://animals.about.com/od/owls/a/owl-facts.htm
[3] http://www.worldanimalfoundation.net/f/Owl.pdf
[4] http://science.jrank.org/pages/5732/Raptors-Raptor-biology.html
[5] http://osca.org/sos_owls.html
[6] http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/owlp/ghowl/document_view